Are There Senior Care Benefits for Veterans?

Are There Senior Care Benefits for Veterans?

Dear Donna:

My great uncle lives alone in northern Michigan. Since his wife passed away, he’s been getting increasingly isolated. While I visit as often as possible, my home is almost three hours away. He’s finally decided he would be better off in a senior living community. We are going to start searching for potential options with a goal of moving in the spring.

A colleague told me his father qualified for special financial assistance because he is a veteran like my uncle. How can I learn more about this program? My uncle has always been careful with his money, but he could benefit from a little help paying for care.

Best,

Nicole

Veterans Benefits for Senior Care

Dear Nicole:
Thank you for asking this question! It provides me with an opportunity to talk about one of my favorite programs. Like you, many veterans and their families aren’t aware of it. Commonly referred to as the Aid and Attendance benefit, it was created to ensure that those who served our nation and their surviving spouses receive the care they need.

Your uncle must meet certain eligibility criteria, including having served 90 days of active-duty service. At least one day of that service must have been during a recognized period of war.

Other eligibility requirements veterans such as your uncle must meet include:

  • Age or disability: To receive this benefit, a veteran must be at least 65 years old or be totally and permanently disabled. Seniors who live in a nursing home or receive skilled nursing care may be eligible, as can veterans who are receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).
  • Financial criteria: There are both income and asset thresholds for veterans applying for the Aid and Attendance benefit. The Veterans Administration will look at the veteran’s overall net worth when determining eligibility.
  • Physical condition: The veteran and/or their surviving spouse must also meet one of these conditions to be eligible:
    • Be bedridden
    • Live in a nursing home due to mental or physical limitations
    • Be blind or nearly blind
    • Require the aid of another person to perform everyday living tasks (e.g., dressing, bathing, feeding, toileting)

While families might think the process is too complicated, it’s important to know it can make a significant difference to veterans who qualify. The financial rewards change every year or two, but can range from $14,761 a year for a surviving spouse to $27,194 for a veteran with a spouse or child.

You can learn more by visiting the Pension Benefits area of the US Department of Veterans Affairs online. The staff at Heritage Senior Communities will also be happy to help answer questions. Call the community nearest you today!

Best of luck in your search, Nicole!

Kind regards,

Donna

How to Pay for Senior Living Community

How to Pay for Senior Living Community

Making the move to a senior living community is a difficult one for you and your loved ones. Unfortunately, this decision isn’t made any easier by the additional questions that arise about who should pay for senior living, and how much it will cost. You want to...
Resources

Resources

Local, State and National Organizations Helpful resources for the aging with direct access to organization websites. General Resources on Aging Elder Law of Michigan Free help to solve problems that arise in retirement or after the age of 60. Elder Law explains...
About

About

HERITAGE SENIOR COMMUNTIES Family owned and based in Michigan for over 25 years Find a Heritage Senior Community Near You EXPLORE COMMUNITIES Find a Heritage Senior Community Near You EXPLORE COMMUNITIES Heritage Senior Communities is a fourth generation, family-owned...